Variety Testing

FRA strongly encourage growers to test all varieties that they wish to plant in their own commercial orchard to ensure that the variety satisfies the grower’s specific requirements.

This is particularly the case for varieties new to a grower – especially those that have only recently been commercialised or introduced into the country. FRA endeavour to recommend / remind growers that it is their own responsibility to properly evaluate any varieties that they are considering planting commercially.

FRA recognises the differing levels of risk associated with the grower’s cultivar selection as generally indicated in the table below.

STATUS

INFORMATION AVAILABLE FOR GROWER TO MAKE THEIR OWN SELECTION, TESTING & ULTIMATE PLANTING DECISIONS

INDICATIVE POTENTIAL RISK MATRIX FOR GROWER

Variety In Quarantine / Yet to be imported / recent release

Grower has seen variety overseas / grower relying solely on ‘generalised’ commentary from overseas.

Higher

Variety In Quarantine / Yet to be imported / recent release

  • Overseas assessments.
  • Indicative information that is available and / or common knowledge at the time such as estimated chilling requirements, suggested pollination, indicative crop load, environmental impacts, any susceptibility issues, specialised growing / cultivation requirements, etc.

High

Variety growing in Australia

Indicative Evaluation reports in Australian conditions.

Moderate

Commercially growing in grower’s own district for 4 plus years

Grower reviews & evaluates variety that their neighbour is growing successfully for 4 plus years.

Lower

Grower evaluates in their own growing conditions

Grower able to fully evaluate all aspects of a variety when grown by them in their own growing conditions.

Preferred

Many factors influence the performance of a variety in a grower’s orchard. These include differences in soils, climate and agronomic techniques. This makes it important for growers to fully test and evaluate any cultivars that they are considering planting commercially. In the end, only the grower can satisfy themselves that the potential cultivar will deliver the fruit they require on their property under their growing practices and conditions.

Put another way, FRA believes that the grower is ultimately responsible for their decision as to what varieties they plant and that they plant new varieties at their own risk.

While a grower may seek feedback from others, including the likes of breeders, horticultural personnel, chemical companies, fruit marketers, nurseries and others involved in the industry, any such feedback, whilst given in good faith, is not able to be guaranteed by any of these other parties – particularly as to the grower’s own growing conditions and specific requirements and, as such, such parties will understandably not accept responsibility for the grower’s own ultimate variety selection decision.

FRA encourages growers to test new varieties in their own orchard(s). Test data from interstate or elsewhere in the same growing region is better than no data at all, but does not substitute for experience in the grower’s own orchard

On reasonable request FRA members readily provide test trees of new cultivars that are openly available to all growers. This allows growers to carry out evaluations on their own property prior to planting commercially.

Important Notice: For clarity, the matters expressed in this website including but not limited to this testing section are done so in good faith by FRA and are limited to the general opinion of FRA as an Association and nothing contained in this website either express or implied represents, alters, amends, or prejudices in any way any conditions of sale and / or terms and conditions of trade for any of the members or associates of FRA relative to that party’s own business activities, policies and associated trading.

FRA strongly encourage growers to test all varieties that they wish to plant in their own commercial orchard to ensure that the variety satisfies the grower’s specific requirements.

This is particularly the case for varieties new to a grower – especially those that have only recently been commercialised or introduced into the country. FRA endeavour to recommend / remind growers that it is their own responsibility to properly evaluate any varieties that they are considering planting commercially.

FRA recognises the differing levels of risk associated with the grower’s cultivar selection as generally indicated in the table below.

STATUS

Variety In Quarantine / Yet to be imported / recent release

INFORMATION AVAILABLE FOR GROWER TO MAKE THEIR OWN SELECTION, TESTING & ULTIMATE PLANTING DECISIONS

Grower has seen variety overseas / grower relying solely on ‘generalised’ commentary from overseas.

INDICATIVE POTENTIAL RISK MATRIX FOR GROWER

Higher

STATUS

Variety In Quarantine / Yet to be imported / recent release

INFORMATION AVAILABLE FOR GROWER TO MAKE THEIR OWN SELECTION, TESTING & ULTIMATE PLANTING DECISIONS

– Overseas assessments.
– Indicative information that is available and / or common knowledge at the time such as estimated chilling requirements, suggested pollination, indicative crop load, environmental impacts, any susceptibility issues, specialised growing / cultivation requirements, etc.

INDICATIVE POTENTIAL RISK MATRIX FOR GROWER

High

STATUS

Variety growing in Australia

INFORMATION AVAILABLE FOR GROWER TO MAKE THEIR OWN SELECTION, TESTING & ULTIMATE PLANTING DECISIONS

Indicative Evaluation reports in Australian conditions.

INDICATIVE POTENTIAL RISK MATRIX FOR GROWER

Moderate

STATUS

Commercially growing in grower’s own district for 4 plus years

INFORMATION AVAILABLE FOR GROWER TO MAKE THEIR OWN SELECTION, TESTING & ULTIMATE PLANTING DECISIONS

Grower reviews & evaluates variety that their neighbour is growing successfully for 4 plus years.

INDICATIVE POTENTIAL RISK MATRIX FOR GROWER

Lower

STATUS

Grower evaluates in their own growing conditions

INFORMATION AVAILABLE FOR GROWER TO MAKE THEIR OWN SELECTION, TESTING & ULTIMATE PLANTING DECISIONS

Grower able to fully evaluate all aspects of a variety when grown by them in their own growing conditions.

INDICATIVE POTENTIAL RISK MATRIX FOR GROWER

Preferred

Many factors influence the performance of a variety in a grower’s orchard. These include differences in soils, climate and agronomic techniques. This makes it important for growers to fully test and evaluate any cultivars that they are considering planting commercially. In the end, only the grower can satisfy themselves that the potential cultivar will deliver the fruit they require on their property under their growing practices and conditions.

Put another way, FRA believes that the grower is ultimately responsible for their decision as to what varieties they plant and that they plant new varieties at their own risk.

While a grower may seek feedback from others, including the likes of breeders, horticultural personnel, chemical companies, fruit marketers, nurseries and others involved in the industry, any such feedback, whilst given in good faith, is not able to be guaranteed by any of these other parties – particularly as to the grower’s own growing conditions and specific requirements and, as such, such parties will understandably not accept responsibility for the grower’s own ultimate variety selection decision.

FRA encourages growers to test new varieties in their own orchard(s). Test data from interstate or elsewhere in the same growing region is better than no data at all, but does not substitute for experience in the grower’s own orchard

On reasonable request FRA members readily provide test trees of new cultivars that are openly available to all growers. This allows growers to carry out evaluations on their own property prior to planting commercially.

Important Notice: For clarity, the matters expressed in this website including but not limited to this testing section are done so in good faith by FRA and are limited to the general opinion of FRA as an Association and nothing contained in this website either express or implied represents, alters, amends, or prejudices in any way any conditions of sale and / or terms and conditions of trade for any of the members or associates of FRA relative to that party’s own business activities, policies and associated trading.

Standardised Testing and Evaluation Agreement

FRA has developed a standardised Testing and Evaluation Agreement that is available for their members to use when supplying grower’s with test trees to evaluate the variety on the grower’s orchard.

The standardised Testing and Evaluation Agreement is intended to assist growers with a more consistent form of testing agreement that will be used in the future by the majority of FRA members which should assist the grower to more easily understand his/her obligations and to comply with same under such a standardised form of test agreement in contrast to the several varied versions that have been traditionally used by the different FRA members.

A sample copy of the ‘standardised’ Testing and Evaluation Agreement is available for review.

Whilst the intention is for FRA members to adopt the standardised Testing and Evaluation Agreement, FRA members have the ultimate right to elect to use their own test agreement and / or to insert additional or amended provisions in the test agreement if that is required for their specific plant material or is a requirement of a breeder / owner or to accommodate their own company requirements. For clarity, we suggest that you simply clarify with the FRA member that you are dealing with on specific plant material the form of agreement that is being used for that plant material offered by that FRA member for testing and evaluation purposes.

 

Fruit Rights Australia Inc.

PO Box 160
Gembrook VIC 3783
T: 0400 117 360
E: execofficer@fra.org.au

Fruit Rights Australia is an incorporated Association. Incorporation No: A0060632T